Connect with us

Most Viewed ;

Emirates completes the largest number of RFID scans for inflight emergency equipment on a daily basis

Emirates completes the largest number of RFID scans for inflight emergency equipment on a daily basis

DUBAI, UAE, 30 October 2019 – As the largest international airline with the biggest fleet of A380s and Boeing 777s, Emirates naturally has a lot of emergency equipment in the skies. To solve the challenge of tracking these essential items on a massive scale and scope, Emirates turned to RFID* technology.

While other airlines have also been using similar technology, Emirates completes the largest number of RFID scans for inflight emergency equipment on a daily basis – that’s for over 250 aircraft and 133,000 life vests. Importantly, it has helped the engineering team maintain emergency equipment across the board with 100% data integrity and compliance, and provide accurate inventory forecasts with much greater efficiencies.

Advertisement

Emirates looks to windowless planes

Sizeable scale

Advertisement

An aircraft typically has around 30 different emergency items, including life vests, baby survival cots, defibrillators, first aid kits, fire extinguishers, medical kits, oxygen bottles and generators and protective breathing equipment. When totalled, Emirates has around 180,000 emergency equipment in its fleet at any one time.

An Airbus A380 has 820 pieces of emergency equipment that used to take 350 minutes to manually inspect, and Emirates has 112 such aircraft in the fleet. Similarly, the airline has 144 Boeing 777 passenger aircraft, each with 540 pieces of emergency equipment that used to take 270 minutes to manually inspect.

Advertisement

Delta’s 777 aircraft to retire by end of 2020, simplifying widebody fleet amid COVID-19

Now thanks to the RFID application, Emirates Engineering can scan an A380 in just 11 minutes, a significant saving of 97% time-wise, and a Boeing 777 in just six minutes, or 98% less time.

Advertisement

Smarter scope

RFID has significantly changed the employee role and interface, improved overall resource efficiencies, and has led to savings of millions annually. The airline has more than 1,800 mechanics trained to complete an aircraft scan.

Advertisement

Emirates To Take Final Airbus A380 Delivery In November 2021

Pre-RFID, to confirm the serviceability of the life vest, mechanics were required to individually access stowage under each of the passenger seats, which could range from 489 to 615 on an A380 and from 354 to 428 in a Boeing 777, and physically read the identification label. Now with all life vests and emergency equipment RFID tagged, a mechanic simply walks through the cabin with a handset that receives all the data, which is uploaded to the Cloud and is then available to the team on any device for future scans.

Advertisement

First Lufthansa Boeing 787-9 to be named “Berlin”

The system generates a full and updated list of serviceable life vests and their exact location. It highlights seats without life vests, or those that are reaching expiry dates, enabling quick replacements.

Advertisement

 

Advertisement

He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

Advertisement