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A Peek Inside BOEING 777X Test Flight at Paris Airshow.

What are latest features of the Boeing 777-9 compared to the Airbus A350.
Boeing 777X at Paris Airshow

Have you ever wondered, How aircraft undergo the process of earning final approval certificates from the FAA or EASA for passenger flight operations after testing?

Let’s have a look at it in the article below. Before building a physical model, the aircraft undergoes extensive design and material selection. As well as testing to determine its requirements and viability.

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Jetline Marvel received permission to visit the inaugural Boeing 777-9 at Paris Airshow 2023. Granting a unique opportunity to glimpse the typically undisclosed aspects of the aerospace industry..

Boeing redesigned the Boeing 777x and B737. Giving them a more contemporary appearance, more spacious cabin, and more sophisticated amenities than the models that came before.

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Exploring Boeing's Testing Process for the 777X and B737 Aircraft

Take into consideration that the aircraft has an even larger engine to increase its speed and carrying capacity. The massive fan is only marginally smaller than the fuselage of a Boeing 737, with a diameter of 128 inches. The GE90-115B held the title of the world’s largest jet engine. Until the introduction of the even larger GE9X for the 777X. Although the engine has a diameter of 134 inches, it does not have the same thrust as the GE90.

Safety in the Skies: How Boeing Ensures Airworthiness Through Testing

Boeing’s 777X test planes, Including the 777-9 variant, feature a range of instruments and systems tailored for flight testing and validation.

These test aircraft assess the aircraft’s performance, safety, and compliance with regulatory requirements before it is ready for commercial service. Here are some of the key components and features typically found inside a Boeing 777X test plane.

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Exploring Boeing's Testing Process for the 777X and B737 Aircraft

Flight Testing the Boeing 777X and B737: What Goes Onboard

Boeing 737-10 and Boeing 777 planes are experimental aircraft. Which are the forthcoming Boeing family aircraft that are currently in the testing process. The B737 Max has undergone minor fitness improvements. Boeing 777X is presently undergoing critical testing phases for its components, with an anticipated completion timeline of another 18 months.

Both aircraft arrived at the 2023 Paris Airshow. They permitted a few reporters to take a look inside the plane. It appears incredible to view the experimental airplane.

From Instruments to Ballast Tanks: The Tools of Aircraft Certification

The interior is designed to accommodate over 400 passengers in a standard two-class commercial layout. Resembles a vast, open space filled with numerous instrument racks.

Even the lateral walls, were devoid of wall finishings and fixtures. contributed to the overall work-in-progress feel of the space.

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The large tanks you can see in this photo are at the back of the aircraft and serve a number of important functions for it to understand its own motion.

To achieve the required balance when the center of gravity of an aircraft or ship falls outside specified tolerances or the designated position, operators use ballast, which primarily consists of rubber or sand.

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Engineers need to transfer water between the tanks to calculate the maximum weight balance of the aircraft under cruising conditions.

Difference between the Airbus A350 and B777x

Here is the difference between the Airbus A350 and B777x fuselage size which is quite bigger than A350 aircraft and the windows are slightly larger as well.

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The cockpit boasts a modern design and incorporates cutting-edge avionics and engine features, elevating the aircraft’s capabilities.

In the aircraft, there are seats in the middle and on the right side, all of which come with soundproof covers. One of the middle seats also has a sensor installed. The left and right sides of the cabin have designated walking areas.

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The difference between the Airbus A350 and B777x can be found in this article.

Furthermore, if you continue moving to the rear, you will notice some of the tanks that will be filled with water based on their weight

On the right side, we can see one of the engineers can sit and monitor the sensors and outside views. Most of the seats in the airplane are in the middle, where computers and sensor panels are arranged along with all the wires and sensors.

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according to the weight load balance during the flight test mode. Internally coupled with pipers and pressure tanks, the tanks can instantaneously flow water within each other.

Exploring Boeing's Testing Process for the 777X and B737 Aircraft

As we move back, we can see one of the controllers, which is usually used to manage the water lines.

At the back end, we can see the fuselage encased and insulated with soundproof materials, which works as a shield for the aircraft fuselage.

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There are approximately four tanks on each side of the row, with around twelve tanks at the back end. We can see outside from the plane’s window and door.

More computers and sensor monitoring chambers appear as we proceed. Engineers’ tasks are critical since they ensure that each test phase is completed. Some of the other journalists are shooting pictures inside the plane.

The aircraft looks impressive even prior to the installation of its seats. Understanding the variations in the aircraft’s data is made possible by the fact that the majority of the sensors are connected to different parts of the aircraft.

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Furthermore, the aircraft is being equipped with the following types of instruments and equipment:

  • Flight Test Equipment: Test planes have special tools and sensors to gather data about how well the aircraft works. They look at things like how it flies, its technology, and how strong it is.
  • Controlling the Aircraft: They check if the systems that control the plane, like the fly-by-wire system, work the right way and are safe.
  • Measuring Stress and Load: Sensors are put in different parts of the plane to see how much stress and pressure it can handle during the tests.
  • Engineers on Board: Engineers are on the plane to keep an eye on everything, collect data, and make decisions during the tests.
  • Computer Programs: They use special computer programs to study the data from the tests. This helps them see how well the plane is doing and what they can make better.
  • Special Tools: Sometimes, they use special equipment, like tanks filled with weights, to copy different conditions during the tests.
  • Safety First: Safety is a big deal, with backup plans and systems to keep the test crew and the plane safe.
  • Like a Prototype: The test plane is like a prototype or an early version of the plane, so it might not have all the fancy features and systems of the final passenger plane.

Please share your thoughts on this article in the comments section. We would also be interested in hearing about any suggestions you may have for future aviation-related articles.

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Aerospace

The LCA Tejas Aircraft Crash: Understanding the Reasons – Air Marshal GS Bedi’s Perspective

The LCA Tejas Aircraft Crash: Understanding the Reasons - Air Marshal GS Bedi's Perspective

Air Marshal GS Bedi, a renowned fighter jet pilot and experienced crew member, recently participated in a YouTube interview with Def Talks hosted by Aadi. During the interview, he provided insights into the recent Tejas aircraft crash in Rajasthan, which marks one of the first crashes involving an aircraft from the Tejas family since its production commenced 20 years ago.

Numerous questions have emerged regarding the circumstances surrounding the Tejas aircraft crash and the potential causes of failure. Air Marshal Bedi adeptly addressed these concerns by outlining possible scenarios that could have led to the crash. His expertise shed light on the complexities involved in such incidents and provided valuable perspective on the aviation community’s understanding of the event.

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At the outset, Tejas lacked a simulator and a trainer aircraft for initial training. However, pilots were provided with simulation trials before flying the Tejas aircraft. Initial reviews indicated stability during flight, with the aircraft maintaining a straight glide. However, there was an incident where the aircraft experienced an engine malfunction, prompting the pilot to eject safely.

Pilot Safe Ejections

The decision to eject was made as a precautionary measure, considering the aircraft’s low altitude and steep descent angle. With the aircraft’s altitude dropping rapidly, attempting to balance and land it was deemed too risky. Ejecting ensured the pilot’s safety, as deploying a parachute at such low altitudes could have been disastrous.

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He chose to eject to ensure a safer distance from the ground. The aircraft is at an angle of less than 3 degrees during the approach. At a height of 100 meters, the aircraft is nearly 20 times its length away from the ground. This means the touchdown point will be approximately 4 kilometers ahead.

However, as the altitude decreases, the approach becomes too short due to the rapid descent rate. Consequently, the pilot opts to eject rather than attempt to stabilize the aircraft for a ground landing. If he had not ejected, there’s a high probability that his parachute would have deployed at that low altitude.

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LCA Tejas engine Issue

Investigations revealed the engine malfunction was likely due to lubrication issues or other technical faults. Such split-second decisions underscore the potentially catastrophic outcomes that can result from technical failures.

The pilot involved was highly experienced and well-trained for airshow displays, suggesting timely decision-making. Nevertheless, accidents can stem from technical glitches, human errors, or unforeseen circumstances like bird strikes.

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Air Marshal Bedi emphasized the importance of pilots being trained for emergency situations, including ejecting from the aircraft when control is lost. Despite advancements in technology, technical issues remain unpredictable, necessitating ongoing learning and improvements in aircraft systems.

Today, the Tejas mk1A aircraft completed its inaugural flight at the Bangalore station, marking the dawn of a new, advanced version of the Tejas aircraft. This iteration boasts enhanced avionics and improved aircraft structure.

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Aerospace

China is secretly testing its next-generation medium combat helicopter Z21

China is secretly testing its next-generation medium combat helicopter Z21

China consistently keeps aviation enthusiasts surprised with its advancements in fighter jets and other aircraft. Leading the pack in Asia, China continuously pushes boundaries in developing domestically-built aircraft.

Recently, images circulating on the internet reveal China’s latest creation, the Z-21 helicopter. Resembling its predecessor, the Z-10, this helicopter boasts enhanced fighter capabilities. The emergence of these images sparks questions regarding the fate of plans to acquire Russian-made Ka-52K attack helicopters, particularly the naval version.

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Observing the helicopter in flight, it shares design elements with the Harbin Z-10, notably in the front fuselage and cockpit canopy. The wing stubs for weapon mounts exhibit similar shapes, though with less pronounced angular features. With a tandem seating arrangement, the Z-21 also draws comparisons to the Mil Mi-28, featuring an elongated body with five rotor blades and weapon bays on its sides.

The unveiling of the Z-21 has triggered speculation about its potential role in future military operations. Analysts suggest that beyond its firepower, its introduction could signal significant technological advancements. There’s particular interest in whether China will incorporate a ‘manned-unmanned teaming’ system akin to later Apache models, enabling the Z-21 to control armed drones for reconnaissance and attacks, reducing risks to the helicopter itself.

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The emergence of the Z-21 underscores China’s increasing military prowess and its commitment to developing cutting-edge weaponry. Its deployment and capabilities will be closely monitored, especially concerning regional security dynamics.

The helicopter presents a significant challenge to American-built Apache and other medium helicopters, boasting superior capacity for flying at higher altitudes and more powerful speed and combat capabilities, thus enhancing its effectiveness on the battlefield. On the other hand, amidst ongoing Indian border tensions, this aircraft is poised to play a crucial role in surveillance along the sensitive China border and beyond.

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Aerospace

Qantas Airbus A330 Makes Safe Landing After Engine Blowout

Woman spends tortuous three months trying to resolve huge Qantas errors

A Qantas Airbus A330 Aircraft, flight number QF781, has landed safely without incident in
Perth after the passengers on the Perth-bound flight reported hearing a ‘loud bang’ from one
side of the twin-engined plane engine. The Airbus A330 aircraft made a priority landing at
Perth Airport around 9:37pm local time on 25 March, arriving approximately 52 minutes
behind schedule.


Upon landing, emergency services met with the aircraft on the tarmac. However, the aircraft
taxied to the gate without assistance, with the passengers disembarking normally.
The ‘loud bang’ heard by passengers happened due to a mid-air engine blowout, therefore
resulting in the pilots having to manually shut off the affected engine, together with
requesting a priority landing into Perth Airport. Qantas also added in a statement that the
Airbus A330 aircraft was designed to operate with one engine too.

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Qantas QF781 is a daily scheduled flight from Melbourne to Perth, utilising the Airbus A330
on the route. The Aircraft in question is VH-EBA, an approximately 21 years aircraft,
equipped with 2 GE CF6 engines according to airfleets.net. The Airbus A330 have been a
frequent regional workhorse in Qantas’ fleet, connecting major australian cities with major
destinations within Asia. the Airbus A330 is also used on high-density domestic routes,
similar to QF781, from Melbourne to Perth.

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Engine Issues – Should you be concerned?


While engine issues are highly uncommon due to the stringent checks and quality control on
each component within the engine, there might still be exceptional occasions where such
incidents happen. However, while recognising the risks of dual engines, Aircraft
Manufacturers and Organisations have actually came up with standards so as to ensure that
an aircraft can also land on a single engine, similar to what we saw on QF781.


One of the most well known standard is Extended-range Twin-engine Operations
Performance Standards (ETOPS) which is an acronym for twin-engine operation in an
airspace further than one hour from a diversion airport at a designated one engine
inoperable speed. This ensures that twin-engined aircraft could safely operate routes over
water or remote land without an alternative airport near the flight path, which once required
aircraft with 3 or 4 engines to fly on that route.

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In this case, the Airbus A330 has been certified to fly ‘Beyond ETOPS 180’, and have
received ETOPS 240 certification, which is a certification to enable the twin-engined aircraft
to fly for up to a maximum of 240 minutes with 1 engine inoperative in a cruise condition.
Currently, most twin-engined widebody aircraft in operation would generally have an ETOPS
certification of at least ETOPS 180, with the new Airbus A321LR also having ETOPS 180
certification, therefore enabling the narrowbody to fly long haul flights.

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