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Woman removed from Delta Airlines flight for not wearing Undergarments

Woman removed from Delta Airlines flight for not wearing Undergarments

A New Zealand traveler, Lisa Archbold, residing in New York, found herself allegedly removed from a Delta Airlines flight between Salt Lake City and San Francisco for not wearing a bra. The performer and publicist claimed that a female crew member confronted her about her attire, deeming it “revealing” and “offensive.”

Despite wearing a baggy white shirt and pants, Lisa was reportedly asked to come to the front of the plane, where the crew member scolded her and insisted she put on a jacket to continue the flight.

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Facing “unseasonably” warm weather in Salt Lake City, Lisa had initially taken off her two jackets while in the airport. Reluctantly complying with the crew’s request, she covered up with her jacket and re-boarded the flight. Upon disembarking, Lisa shared her experience with the male head flight attendant, labeling it as discrimination. According to her, he stated that the airline’s official policy is that women must cover-up.

Lisa, identifying as queer, expressed her belief that she was unfairly targeted due to not conforming to traditional gender norms. She asserted that the crew member “weaponized a policy to mistreat people who are different.” As a DJ and vocalist known by the stage name DJette Kiwi, Lisa mentioned that Delta, once a favorite due to its reputation for inclusivity, seemed to fall short in this instance.

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While Delta does not have a specific dress code, the airline reserves the right to remove passengers if their “conduct, attire, hygiene, or odor” poses an unreasonable risk of offense or annoyance to others. Lisa argues that such a policy can be exploited by bigots and exposes supposedly inclusive companies to potential misuse. The incident raises questions about the balance between airline policies and ensuring fair treatment for passengers of diverse backgrounds.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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