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How many MiG-21 jets are there in the IAF ? when will it be phased out

Here is details about how many MiG 21 fighters have crashed since they were first used by the Indian Air Force.

How many MiG-21 jets are there in the IAF ? when will it be phased out

The fighter plane MiG 21 of the Indian Air Force crashed in Rajasthan, India, yesterday. There are no rumors building up or questions being directed at the Indian Air Force regarding the continued use of such aircraft in the air force despite their poor safety record and history of mishaps.

Is the MiG-21 a good plane?

The MiG-21 has been used by about 60 nations on four continents, and six decades after its debut flight, it is still in widespread use in many countries. The MiG 21 was created in the Soviet Union by Mikoyan Gurevich. It made its initial flight on June 16, 1955, and was later released as the MiG 21F for military use. As of right present, the Soviet, Indian, Croatian, and Romanian Air Forces are the four defenses operating this fighter plane. According to the source, 11,496 of this aircraft were built between 1959 and 1989, when it went out of production.

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The McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle and General Dynamics F-16 Fighting Falcon have since surpassed it, making it the most-produced supersonic jet aircraft in aviation history, the most-produced combat aircraft since the Korean War, and the combat aircraft with the longest manufacturing run.

 

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How many MiG-21 are there in Indian Air Force?

India is the country that uses the MiG 21 fighter the most. As opposed to the western fighter jets, India purchased the MIG 21 in 1961. The Soviet Union provided Indian technology and the right to assemble aircraft locally as part of the agreement.

More than 1200 MiG fighters have been introduced to the Indian military since 1963. India currently has 113 fighter aircraft in service. However, the aircraft has experienced numerous safety issues.

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Why The Fighter Plane is Called ‘Flying coffins’?

Due to repeated crashes, this plane was also known as the widow maker and the flying coffins. The aircraft’s safety record was poor.

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The fighter jet has earned the nickname “flying coffin” as a result of its frequent crashes. Due to the accidents, it is also referred to as the “widow-maker.” The aeroplane has recently had an extremely bad safety record.

This fighter plane has claimed the lives of more than 180 Indian pilots and 50 civilians since 1970. In the past 60 years, the Indian Air Force has lost around 400 MiG-21 aircraft in crashes.

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What is the main contributor to MiG 21 fighter plane crashes ?

Older design components and compatibility have serious problems, and this plane’s engine design is also a significant problem. Even a small bird can cause an engine surge or seizure and flame out when the engine is in afterburner because it works so closely to its surge line. Predictive maintenance is difficult because the aircraft is almost 35 years old and is an old one.

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What will happen to the MiG-21 fighter jet of the Indian Air Force?

The choice has been made by the Indian Defense department. The Indian Air Force (IAF) chose to retire one more squadron of the MiG-21 Bison aircraft by September 30 and the whole fleet by 2025 after the IAF fighter plane disaster claimed the lives of two pilots. The investigation into the accident’s cause was mandated by the court of inquiry.

The indigenous fighter jet Tejas aircraft was intended to replace the MiG 21 in a phase-out plan by the Defense Department. Thus, a plan will be put into action as soon as the aircraft are introduced to the squadron; by 2025, nearly all MiG 21 fighter jets will have been phased out of service. The IAF is also preparing a new fleet for the future, complete with upgraded features and armaments.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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