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Why do Ryanair seats have NO back pockets? Ryanair has uncovered the design of its ‘game changing’ new seats

Ryanair

Ryanair has unveiled the design of its ‘game changing’ new seats which will benefit passengers.

But the budget Irish airline still won’t use back pockets.

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The new seats will give customers 31 inches of legroom, one inch more than the current design.

They will also be lighter and will enable the aircraft to fit 197 seats on board instead of 189.

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This means fares will be lower for passengers, according to the airline.

The seats will be installed on Ryanair’s new fleet of Boeing 737 MAX 200, due to be delivered in spring 2019.

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But as is the case with the current seats, there won’t be any back pockets on the new design.

Ryanair hasn’t used back pockets on its seats in over a decade. The airline says this enables a quicker turnaround time by reducing the amount of items to be cleaned and checked.

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A spokesperson said: “Ryanair’s current fleet of Boeing 737-800 aircraft have a seat pitch of 30 inches – more legroom than British Airways and Lufthansa economy seats.

 

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“All Boeing 737 Max ‘Gamechanger’ aircraft, delivered from Spring 2019 onwards, will have the new Zodiac seats announced on Wednesday, with a roomier 31 inch seat pitch, and due to the new sculpted seat back, also provide additional knee and shin room at the same pitch.

“Since 2004, Ryanair seats have not included seat back pockets, allowing us to maintain our industry-leading 25 minute turnaround, and reduce cleaning costs – which are passed on to customers through lower fares.

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“Adding seat pockets to our seats is not something we are asked for by our customers.”

The airline also considered removing armrests when it reduced the size of its in-flight magazine back in 2012, but “decided against it”.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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