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Alaska Airlines donates a plane to Portland Community College

Alaska Airlines donates a plane to Portland Community College

Alaska Airlines and its sibling firm Horizon Air donated a plane to Portland Community College, which will be used by students to practice repairs and learn about aviation mechanics. The jet’s estimated value is $650,000. With this donation, PCC’s aviation programs will now have access to more cutting-edge hands-on learning experiences.

This donated Horizon Q400 will be kept at the Hillsboro Airport for usage by instructors and students. For students to engage in practical learning with a big transport plane, the avionics systems and structure will be in tact. In addition to the Q400, Horizon gave away 50 iPads to make sure that the crew had the most recent operating instructions and manuals to operate the aircraft to commercial standards.

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Boeing estimates that during the next 20 years, the airline industry would experience shortages of more than 600,000 workers, including pilots and airline technicians. Already, the scarcity is reducing the number of flights that airlines can operate each day.

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The Portland area’s demand for aviation mechanics is expected to increase by 14.6% through 2027, while the national demand for pilots is expected to increase by 6%, according to the Oregon Employment Department. The demand for new certified airframe and powerplant mechanics in the aviation sector is high, as demonstrated by Boeing’s report.

The AMT Program has a success rate (first time taking each class) of about 70%, which is roughly twice the rate of PCC as a whole. Nearly all AMT students who attempt the certification examinations after finishing the programme receive their certificates.

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The aircraft will be used by AMT to immerse students in contemporary commercial aircraft technology and the dynamics of turbine engines, analyse the use of contemporary maintenance documentation to perform and troubleshoot, train on the typical servicing and maintenance procedures encountered by new mechanics in the field, review electronic flight deck systems and maintenance diagnostics, and practise engine run and aircraft taxi procedures as well as aircraft ground movement procedures.

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AVS will use it as an airline/transport aircraft procedural trainer and will undertake familiarization training for transport aircraft systems, including turbine engine education and transport aircraft avionics (instruments and navigation).

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