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Guess why Airbus put three Camera on this A350 test aircraft?

Airbus put three on this A350 test aircraft?

Every other day, Airbus introduces a new invention that puts them in front of the curve and makes flying easier, which is crucial for us.

Airbus created a new camera with natural inspiration that enables pilots to see objects in challenging conditions. And provides the Pilots with clear notifications. There will be a lot of activities at the airport at some point, and aircraft movement will also be recorded. This technology aids the pilot in resolving the problem.

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Airbus UpNext, a wholly owned subsidiary of Airbus, has started testing new, on-ground and in-flight, pilot assistance technologies on an A350-1000 test aircraft.

Known as DragonFly, the technologies being demonstrated include automated emergency diversion in cruise, automatic landing, and taxi assistance and are aimed at evaluating the feasibility and pertinence of further exploring autonomous flight systems in support of safer and more efficient operations.

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The usage of the three cameras on the A350 aircraft has been requested by Airbus. Later, a demonstration of how this technology is used for pilots was shown.

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These 3 cameras allow our #A350 test aircraft to “see” and safely maneuver within its surroundings by reviewing and identifying features in the landscape

During the flight test campaign, the technologies were able to assist pilots in-flight, managing a simulated incapacitated crew member event, and during landing and taxiing operations. Taking into account external factors such as flight zones, terrain and weather conditions, the aircraft was able to generate a new flight trajectory plan and communicate with both Air Traffic Control (ATC) and the airline Operations Control Centre.

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Airbus UpNext has also explored features for taxi assistance, which were tested in real-time conditions at Toulouse-Blagnac Airport. The technology provides the crew with audio alerts in reaction to obstacles, assisted speed control, and guidance to the runway using a dedicated airport map.

In addition to these capabilities, Airbus UpNext is launching a project to prepare the next generation of computer vision-based algorithms to advance landing and taxi assistance.

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These tests were made possible through cooperation with Airbus subsidiaries and external partners including Cobham, Collins Aerospace, Honeywell, Onera and Thales. DragonFly was partially funded by the French Civil Aviation Authority (DGAC) as part of the French Stimulus plan, which is part of the European Plan, Next Generation EU, and the France 2030 plan.

The Airbus UpNext DragonFly prototype is inspired by the dragonfly’s remarkable vision and cunning flight abilities. The last three months of testing for DragonFly will put its automatic landing technology, pilot support technology, and flightpath capability to the test.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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