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Boeing faces paying £1bn to loved once and family of 346 victims who died in accidents

Boeing

According to Daily mail and Bloomberg The amount of money Boeing may need to pay groups of 737 Max crash unfortunate casualties could rely upon one disturbing factor – How long the passengers spent realizing they were diving to their deaths.

Did Boeing pay survivors?

The arrangement of claims that could surpass $1 billion shoot much higher if proof shows Boeing thought about imperfections in the planes before the disasters occurred.

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A Lion Air flight from Jakarta, Indonesia and Depati Amir Airport crashed into the sea 12 minutes after takeoff, claiming 189 lives in October 2018.

And in March, an Ethiopian Airlines flight from Addis Ababa Bole Airport flying to Nairobi, Kenya crashed six minutes after takeoff, killing 157 aboard. 

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The Ethiopian disaster led to the worldwide grounding of the 737 Max, which accounts for around a third of Boeing’s operating profit.

While the precise causes of the crashes are still being determined, it is believed preliminary evidence is raising the liability risk for Boeing.

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The claim affirms carelessness, just as inability to caution and common intrigue.

Another 30 relatives have now made a move against the organization for the benefit of the perished.

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The measure is just a single piece of the incredibly intricate legitimate battle, in which families could likewise guarantee harms for distress, distress, loss of companionship and even future checks.

It comes as Boeing confessed to thinking about a specialized issue with its 737 Max ‘cockpit wellbeing alert’ a year prior to the two airplane fatal crash

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The feature was designed to warn pilots when a key sensor might be providing incorrect information about the pitch of the plane’s nose.

But within months of the plane’s debut in 2017 engineers realised that the sensor warning light only worked when airlines also bought a separate, optional feature – but did not disclose the concerns to airlines or safety regulators.

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The sensors malfunctioned during the flight in Indonesia.

Courtesy : Dailymail

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

Airlines

US DOT says Airlines must now pay automatic refunds for cancelled flights

US DOT says Airlines must now pay automatic refunds for cancelled flights

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has released a final regulation requiring airlines to quickly reimburse passengers with automatic cash refunds when owed, according to a statement made by the Biden-Harris Administration.

Under the new regulation, passengers will find it easier to get refunds when airlines dramatically alter or cancel flights, cause severe delays for checked baggage, or don’t supply the additional services they paid for.

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According to a statement from the Biden-Harris Administration, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) has published a final rule mandating airlines to promptly compensate customers with automatic cash refunds when they are eligible. The new rule would make it simpler for customers to receive refunds from airlines in cases when they drastically change or cancel flights, cause significant delays for checked luggage, or fail to provide the extra services they charged for.

Under the latest rule from the USDOT, passengers are guaranteed refunds in several scenarios:

  1. Canceled or Significantly Changed Flights: Passengers are entitled to refunds if their flight is canceled or significantly altered, including changes in departure or arrival times exceeding 3 hours domestically or 6 hours internationally, departures or arrivals from different airports, increased connections, downgrades in service class, or changes less accommodating to passengers with disabilities.
  2. Delayed Baggage Return: Passengers filing mishandled baggage reports can claim a refund for checked bag fees if their luggage is not returned within specific timeframes after flight arrival.
  3. Unprovided Extra Services: If airlines fail to deliver paid extra services like Wi-Fi, seat selection, or inflight entertainment, passengers can request refunds for those fees.

The final rule streamlines the refund process, ensuring it is:

  • Automatic: Refunds are issued automatically without requiring passengers to request them.
  • Prompt: Airlines must refund credit card purchases within seven business days and other payment methods within 20 calendar days.
  • In Original Form of Payment: Refunds are provided in the original payment method used for purchase.
  • Full Amount: Passengers receive full refunds minus the value of any portion of transportation already used, including government and airline fees.

Suggest banning family seating junk fees and ensuring that parents can travel with their kids at no additional cost. No airline promised to ensure fee-free family seating prior to efforts from President Biden and Secretary Buttigieg last year. Family seating is now guaranteed free of charge on four airlines, and the Department is working on a plan to eliminate family seating junk fees.

Propose to make passenger compensation and amenities mandatory so that travelers are taken care of when airlines cause flight delays or cancellations. 

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Middle East

British Airways Resumes Daily Flights to Abu Dhabi, After 4-Year hiatus

British Airways Resumes Daily Flights to Abu Dhabi, After 4-Year hiatus
Photo: Wikipedia

British Airways made its way back to Abu Dhabi, landing at Zayed International Airport. Following a four-year break in service, both crew and passengers were greeted with enthusiasm.

In the summer of 2024, British Airways plans to launch a daily route, utilising a Boeing 787-9, from London Heathrow to Abu Dhabi. The new route enhances ties between the UAE and the UK and expands  vast worldwide network, catering to passengers who may be visiting friends and family or travelling for business.

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Arriving in Abu Dhabi at 08.30+1, flight BA073 to Abu Dhabi leaves London Heathrow at 22.25. Departing at 10.10 and landing at London Heathrow at 15.20 is the inbound flight (BA072).

The chief executive officer and managing director of Abu Dhabi Airports, Elena Sorlini, stated: “We are delighted to welcome British Airways to Zayed International Airport. Their daily schedule is expected to improve connectivity and stimulate travel and business.” Visitors may experience the dynamic capital of the United Arab Emirates like never before at our brand-new, award-winning, state-of-the-art terminal, where they will be welcomed with the best kind of Emirati hospitality.”

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Flight schedule:

London Heathrow (LHR) to Zayed International (AUH)All times are local
 
SeasonFlight numberDeparting LHRArriving AUHFlight numberDeparting AUHArriving LHR
Summer ‘24BA7322:2508:30+1BA7210:1015:20
Winter ‘24BA7322:2509:30+1BA7211:1015:20

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Airlines

EU Bans Turkish-based Southwind Airlines due to links with Russia

EU Bans Turkish-based Southwind Airlines due to links with Russia

In a significant move reflecting the ongoing geopolitical tensions, the European Union (EU) has taken measures to prohibit Turkey’s Southwind Airlines from utilizing its airspace.

The decision, stemming from alleged connections with Russia, underscores the broader repercussions of Russia’s actions in Ukraine and the subsequent international sanctions imposed.

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The ban, enforced on March 29, disrupts Southwind Airlines’ operations, initially leading to the cancellation of flights. The Finnish transport authority Traficom, headed by Jarkko Saarimäki, has been instrumental in elucidating the rationale behind the EU’s decision. Saarimäki’s assessment highlights a concerning lack of substantial ownership and effective control held by Turkish entities within Southwind Airlines.

Established in 2022 in Antalya, Turkey, Southwind Airlines had primarily focused on flights originating from Russia. However, scrutiny into its ownership structure has revealed apparent links to Russian stakeholders, prompting concerns over its allegiance and operational control. Saarimäki’s assertion of Russian influence over the airline’s affairs underscores the broader geopolitical implications of such connections.

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The EU’s ban extends beyond merely restricting Southwind Airlines’ access to its airspace; it also encompasses prohibitions on takeoffs, landings, and overflights within EU territory. Consequently, the airline faces operational hurdles, impacting its routes not only to Finnish destinations like Helsinki but also to prominent German cities and potentially planned routes such as Zurich.

This development aligns with the stance adopted by other Western nations, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada, which have implemented similar bans on Russian airlines. Such coordinated actions underscore the global resolve to hold Russia accountable for its aggressive actions in Ukraine and to mitigate potential security risks posed by entities with alleged ties to Russian interests.

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