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3 Taliban tried to fly an American helicopter but were killed in the accident.

Three people were killed after a Black Hawk chopper crashed during a Taliban training exercise in Kabul

How did DARPA's Black Hawk fly without a pilot?

Three people were killed after a Black Hawk chopper crashed during a Taliban training exercise in Kabul, according to the group’s defense ministry on Saturday.

All of the aircraft’s instruments and equipment were damaged and rendered inoperable when the US withdrew from Afghanistan. Given that they were left in Afghanistan, these represent the largest technological asset that any nation possesses. The mess of leaving the pricey aircraft over the Taliban was caused by the turmoil of the populace’s instability and the safe deployments of the military from Afghanistan.

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After a while, the Taliban began organizing its own army and air force team to handle such aircraft, but they soon found themselves dissatisfied because they were unable to find qualified mechanics to repair complex aircraft.

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According to a spokesperson for the Ministry of Defense, Enaytullah Khowrazmi, “an American Black Hawk chopper, which was for training, crashed due to a technical malfunction inside the campus of the National Defence University,” adding that five other persons were hurt as well.

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Even when fixed, these helicopters are tough to fly because of their complex systems and numerous controls, which are challenging for even experienced pilots to comprehend.

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After taking over the nation a little over a year ago, the Taliban grabbed control of some American-made aeroplanes.

It is yet unknown how many are active. While departing, U.S. forces purposefully destroyed certain military equipment, and Afghan forces dispatched some helicopters to countries in central Asia.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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