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Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x for Boeing 777x

Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x for Boeing 777x

1.Crafting the GEnx jet engine is something of a puzzle—around 75,000 parts must come together just right to build the final product.

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Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x Image courtesy : General Electrical

2. GE 9x Developed primarily for the new Boeing 777X, this behemoth is wider than the fuselage of a 737 jet and can generate more than 100,000 pounds of thrust

Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x Image courtesy : General Electrical & Boeing

3. This giant orb controls the wind intake during simulations of engine distress. Called the turbulence control structure (TCS), it’s 30,000 pounds of aluminum and stainless steel.

Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x

ORB : Image courtesy : General Electrical

 

  1. Each of GE jet engines undergoes approximately 150 hours of simulated testing.

GE Testing center Image courtesy : General Electrical

5. GE 9x undergone rigorous testing to simulate real world conditions, from frightening sand storms to ice slabs as thick as cutting boards.

6. The GE90 is the most powerful jet engine in the world, with the quietest rumble of any engine in its thrust class. Acoustic panels installed in the engine’s fan case, pictured here, help reduce its noise signature.

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Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x

GE 9x Engine fitted on 747-400 – Image courtesy : General Electrical

7. One of the ways we test whether a  jet engine is sturdy enough for flight is by putting it through rigorous testing to simulate real world conditions, from frightening sand storms to ice slabs as thick as cutting boards. Here’s a look at the GEnx engine installed for testing at GE facility in Winnipeg.

8. A look inside our  jetengine testing facility in Peebles, Ohio, where the walls of each of our testing cells are at least 20 feet thick. Built from special high-density concrete, made by vibrating the wet concrete down to squeeze out air and get rid of any weak spots, these testing cells are strong enough to simulate extreme conditions for GE jet engine.

Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x

Testing center : Image courtesy General electrical

9. The General Electric GE9Xis a high-bypass turbofan aircraft engine under development by GE Aviation for the Boeing 777X. Derived from the GE90

10. The first engine to test (FETT) completed its first test run in April 2016. With 375 cycles and 335 test hours.

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Top 15 things about World Largest Engine GE 9x

Image courtesy : Boeing

11. GE 9x has the largest front fan at 134 inches in diameter with a composite fan case and 16 fourth generation carbon fiber composite fan blades

12. The GE9X went through icing tests in winter 2017. The FETT was finally used for 50 cold weathertest points such as ground fog or natural icing conditions,

13. The initial 777X flight-test engines will be shipped later in 2018 for an initial 777-9 flight in early 2019.

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14. In 1995, the GE90 engine debuted aboard a British Airways 777 airplane along with commercial aviation’s first-ever carbon-fiber composite fan blades. Early GE90 engine models boasted outputs between 74,000 and 94,000 lbs. of thrust, and today it remains the world’s largest turbofan engine.

15. With the GE90, GE introduced the composite fan blade—the first-ever in commercial aviation. Measuring more than four feet long and weighing less than 50 pounds, the GE90 fan blade is made from carbon fiber and a toughened epoxy matrix that delivers double the strength and one-third the weight of titanium.

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Source: GE Press releases & Boeing

Image courtesy: GE

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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