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SABRE a rocket engine designed to power aircraft directly into space..!

Airbus has confirmed that it will work with France, Germany, and Spain to build the Future Combat Air System (FCAS).

SABRE (Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine) is a concept under development by Reaction Engines Limited for a hypersonic precooled hybrid air breathing rocket engine.

The engine has been designed to achieve single-stage-to-orbit capability, propelling the proposed Skylon launch vehicle. SABRE is an evolution of Alan Bond’s series of liquid air cycle engine (LACE) and LACE-like designs that started in the early/mid-1980s for the HOTOL project.

The design comprises a single combined cycle rocket engine with two modes of operation. The air breathing mode combines a turbo-compressor with a lightweight airprecooler positioned just behind the inlet cone. At high speeds this precooler cools the hot, ram-compressed air leading to an unusually high pressure ratio within the engine.

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The compressed air is subsequently fed into the rocket combustion chamber where it is ignited with stored liquid hydrogen. The high pressure ratio allows the engine to continue to provide high thrust at very high speeds and altitudes. The low temperature of the air permits light alloy construction to be employed which gives a very lightweight engine—essential for reaching orbit. In addition, unlike the LACE concept, SABRE’s precooler does not liquefy the air letting it run more efficiently.

After shutting the inlet cone off at Mach 5.14, 28.5 km altitude, the system continues as aclosed cycle high performance rocket engine burning liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen from on-board fuel tanks, potentially allowing a hybrid spaceplane concept like Skylon to reach orbital velocity after leaving the atmosphere on a steep climb.

An engine derived from the SABRE concept called Scimitar has been designed for the company’s A2 hypersonic passenger jet proposal for the European Union-funded LAPCAT study.

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In November 2012, Reaction Engines announced it had successfully concluded a series of tests that proved the cooling technology of the engine, one of the main obstacles towards the completion of the project. The European Space Agency (ESA) has evaluated the SABRE engine’s pre-cooler heat exchanger and accepted claims that the technologies required to proceed with the engine’s development had been fully demonstrated.

As of July 2013, the United Kingdom has earmarked £60 million for the development of a full-scale prototype of the SABRE engine, citing the viability of its core technologies based on testing performed by the ESA.

As of June 2015, SABRE’s development continues with The Advanced Nozzle Project in Westcott, UK. The test engine, operated by Airborne Engineering Ltd, is being used to analyze the aerodynamics and performance of the advanced nozzles that the SABRE engine will use, in addition to new manufacturing technologies such as the 3D-printed propellant injection system.

Source: Wikipedia. Pictures: Reaction engines Ltd.

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Aerospace

Boeing 777-9 Begins Certification Flight Testing with FAA Onboard

Boeing 777-9 Begins Certification Flight Testing with FAA Onboard

The 777-9 has commenced certification flight testing at Boeing Field in Seattle. This is a crucial step under the supervision of our regulator to certify the airplane and deliver it to customers worldwide.

Amidst Boeing’s current challenges, the B777X stands out as a project that could revitalize the brand. It is highly anticipated, and Boeing is keen to clear FAA certifications to release it as soon as possible.

Boeing 777-8F vs Airbus A350F: Comparing two Premium aircraft : Click here

The aircraft is two years behind its initial commitment date. During this time, the company has rigorously tested it under various conditions to ensure its readiness for commercial service.

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Boeing has announced that the 777X will be used for both passenger and freighter services, depending on customer requirements.

Boeing’s 777X program has achieved a major milestone with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) granting approval to begin certification flight tests, marking a significant step towards the aircraft’s entry into commercial service.

Mega Comparison of Boeing 777x vs A350-1000 Aircraft : Click here

The European Union granted approval for this merger in February, and Korean Air anticipates U.S. regulatory approval by the end of October.

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Following Airbus’ breakthrough with Korean Air, Reuters reported in April that Korean Air was considering a new Boeing order focused on the 777X, an advanced version of the 777 mini-jumbo.

Boeing 777-9 First certification

The first certification flight test of the 777-9 took place on Friday evening, with FAA personnel onboard alongside Boeing’s pilots and flight test team.

According to The Seattle Times, the aircraft departed from Boeing Field shortly after 6 p.m. and landed nearly two hours later after flying along the Washington and Oregon coast.

The 777X, an upgraded version of the successful 777 twinjet, features new engines and carbon composite wings with folding wingtips to accommodate standard airport gates.

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The first variant, the 777-9X, is designed to carry 426 passengers in a two-class configuration for long-haul international flights.

Comparison of two legendary aircraft Boeing 777x vs Boeing 747 aircraft : Click here

Boeing B777x total orders

Boeing has secured 481 orders for the aircraft, with Emirates being the largest customer, having ordered over 200 units. The planemaker has already built and stored 22 777X jets, with an additional six in various stages of assembly in Everett, Washington.

Boeing is close to finalizing a significant deal to sell approximately two dozen 777X jets to Korean Air, with an estimated value ranging from $4 billion to $6 billion, as reported by Reuters.

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Industry sources suggest that the agreement could be concluded as early as the Farnborough Airshow in July. Korean Air, South Korea’s largest airline, has been in discussions about returning to Boeing for its long-haul aircraft needs.

The Boeing 777X vs A350 is one of the most popular comparisons among aircraft as of now. The Airbus A350 has been operating for more than eight years, and its promising performance helps airlines in terms of efficiency and customer satisfaction, particularly in noise and vibrations.

The next generation Boeing 777X can fulfill the same requirements, with 777x first delivery given to Emirates Airlines, the launch customer for this aircraft. It remains to be seen how the Boeing 777X vs Airbus A350 will compete against each other in the future.

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