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Pilatus Enhances PC-24 Jet’s Range, Payload, and Interior Amenities

Pilatus Enhances PC-24 Jet's Range, Payload, and Interior Amenities

Pilatus has increased the payload-range capability of its Super Versatile Jet to achieve a maximum range with six passengers of 2,000 nautical miles (3,704 km) beginning with new aircraft deliveries in 2024.

Pilatus also incorporated an array of new interior amenities, including a large side-facing divan which can be converted into a bed. The new PC-24 has an increased maximum payload capacity and full fuel payload of 600 pounds (272 kg).

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With six passengers on board, this enables operators to extend the PC-24’s maximum range by 200 nm (370 km). The PC-24 currently has a class-leading maximum payload capacity of 3,100 pounds (1,406 kg), which includes a single pilot plus 1,315 pounds (596 lb) of full fuel payload.

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To widen the overall envelope for the heavier design weights, Pilatus engineers ran a lengthy flying test campaign. Balanced field length at sea level for the PC-24’s maximum takeoff weight is only 3,090 feet (941 metres), enabling the use of extremely brief and even unpaved runways.

A new integrated cabin management system (iCMS) with a 10″ touch screen controller, a 3D moving map, four high-fidelity cabin speakers with a sub-woofer option, mood lighting, USB connections, and a media storage server was developed by Pilatus in collaboration with Lufthansa Technik.

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A new feature that enables predictive services will be included with every PC-24 starting with serial number 501. Upon landing, the automated data transmission of critical aircraft data to Pilatus will be examined, and if necessary, the operator will receive a predictive recommendation.

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Ex-Cathay Pacific A330-300 Destroyed by Fire during Long-Term Storage at Spain

Ex-Cathay Pacific A330-300 Destroyed by Fire during Long-Term Storage at Spain

In a dramatic turn of events, an ex-Cathay Pacific Airbus A330 met a fiery end at Ciudad Real Airport in Spain. The aircraft, with a distinguished service history spanning 28 years, was resting in long-term storage at the airport when disaster struck.

Reports emerged detailing the unfortunate incident, painting a picture of destruction and chaos. The once majestic A330, bearing the serial number MSN113, became engulfed in flames while undergoing dismantling procedures. What began as a routine process turned into a nightmare as a fire erupted in the aircraft’s tail section, quickly spreading to consume the entire fuselage.

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Emergency responders, including the Civil Guard, medical teams, and law enforcement personnel, swiftly descended upon the scene to contain the inferno. Despite the intensity of the blaze, their coordinated efforts prevented any injuries among both the public and the brave individuals working to quell the flames.

By mid-afternoon, the Ciudad Real fire service declared victory over the fire, announcing its successful extinguishment. However, the aftermath left behind a trail of questions and concerns. Authorities launched an investigation into the cause of the blaze, with initial findings shrouded in mystery.

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The head of the airport expressed astonishment at the unprecedented event, highlighting it as the first instance where airport infrastructure had to grapple with such a significant fire-related challenge. As the investigation unfolds, the aviation community awaits answers, hoping to shed light on the circumstances leading to the demise of the retired Airbus A330.

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Air India’s last VVIP Boeing 747 now found a new home in USA

Air India's last VVIP Boeing 747 now found a new home in USA
Image:Wikipedia

In a symbolic transition marking the end of a storied chapter in aviation history, Air India bid farewell to its last remaining Boeing 747-400 jumbo jetliners, once revered for ferrying dignitaries including prime ministers, presidents, and vice presidents.

The sale of these iconic aircraft to AerSale, a company based in the United States, signals the closure of a remarkable era for the airline.

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The decision to part ways with the Boeing 747s was driven by practical considerations. Tata Group, the new custodian of airindia flights, deemed these majestic planes uneconomical to operate in today’s aviation landscape. As such, out of the four sold, two will be repurposed into freighters, while the remaining pair will be meticulously disassembled to harness their valuable parts.

The transaction, orchestrated by Mumbai-based Vman Aviation Services, underscores the strategic shift in Air India’s fleet management strategy under its new ownership. Tata Group’s decision to divest from the 747s reflects a commitment to optimizing operational efficiency and aligning with contemporary industry standards.

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Skytech-AIC, a UK-based remarketing firm engaged by Tata Group, facilitated the sale of these iconic aircraft, marking the conclusion of their illustrious service with Air India. The airline’s last flight featuring the Boeing 747 took to the skies between Delhi and Mumbai in March 2021, encapsulating decades of distinguished service and indelible memories.

The allure of used aircraft parts continues to resonate across the aviation sector, offering operators a cost-effective alternative without compromising on quality or performance. The transfer of these aircraft to AerSale not only ensures their continued utility but also underscores the enduring legacy of Air India’s fleet.

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A software error caused grounding the entire airline fleet

A software error caused the grounding entire airline fleet

On Wednesday, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued a ground stop advisory for all Alaska Airlines and subcarrier flights due to a software issue, disrupting travel plans for passengers.

The FAA directive, which prohibited the departure of Alaska Airlines mainline and subcarrier flights, was implemented as a precautionary measure following the detection of the software problem. The ground stop was initiated after Alaska Airlines encountered difficulties during a system upgrade related to the calculation of weight and balance for their flights.

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As a result, the airline opted for a temporary suspension of all its operations to address the issue and ensure passenger safety. Alaska Airlines promptly issued a statement acknowledging the incident and expressing their commitment to resolving the matter swiftly. “This morning we experienced an issue while performing an upgrade to the system that calculates our weight and balance.

Out of an abundance of caution, we requested a ground stop for all Alaska and Horizon flights, which was instituted at approximately 7:30 a.m. PT,” the statement read. Passengers affected by the disruption voiced their concerns on social media platforms, prompting Alaska Airlines to reassure them of their efforts to minimize the inconvenience and expedite the resumption of flights.

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Following approximately an hour-long interruption, the FAA lifted the ground stop order, allowing Alaska Airlines and its subcarriers to resume normal operations. However, it was clarified that SkyWest, which provides regional service for Alaska Airlines and other carriers, was exempt from the ground stop and continued its flights unaffected.

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