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How did four children live in the Amazon jungle for forty days after the crash?

The Cessna single-engine propeller plane carrying six people and a pilot made an emergency declaration owing to an engine failure in the early hours of May 1. This is when the tragedy occurred.

Four children miraculously survived the crash and went 40 days without assistance. The rescue crew was sent to the crash site to look, but they were unsuccessful. Moreover, because of the deep bush, it was impossible to find them.

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Shortly after the little plane vanished from the radar, a desperate hunt for survivors started. On May 16, two weeks after the Amazon plane accident, a search party discovered the aircraft in a dense area of the rainforest. and removed the three adults on the board’s bodies. However, the little children were nowhere to be found. 

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A chopper was seen pulling the children up using lines in an air force video. because the dense rainforest where they were found prevented them from landing. In the dwindling light, the craft took off. A little settlement on the outskirts of the bush called San Jose del Guaviare was where the air force claimed to be headed.

How the four siblings, ages 13, 9, 4, and 11 months, were able to live alone for such a long time was not made public. Despite the fact that they are a member of an Indigenous group and reside in a rural area

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When the Colombian army realized they could still be alive, they intensified the search and flew 150 soldiers with dogs into the region. Numerous Indigenous tribe volunteers also contributed to the search.

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During the hunt, in a region where mist and dense vegetation severely restrict visibility. Soldiers threw food baskets into the woods from helicopters. In the hopes that it will support the kids. Flares were thrown from aircraft flying over the jungle to assist ground search teams at night. The siblings’ grandmother recorded a message that was broadcast over speakers by rescuers, urging them to remain in one spot.

The older child is aware of survival skills.

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They belong to the Huitoto tribe, and according to officials, the older kids in the group knew how to survive in the rainforest.

According to sources, children were observed eating food that their mother had transported in an airplane. By drinking water with their meals, they stayed hydrated and kept themselves shielded from the rain. All of the children that can be seen are clearly ill. They made an effort to get to a place where some people could accommodate them, but due to the impenetrable forest, they only managed to traverse 3.5 kilometers of ground in 40 days. Interestingly, no animals ever harm them.

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Soon after a search, there was hope that they were still alive. The first find was a pair of children’s tennis shoes that were found close to the crash site. Rescuers later discovered a bottle, a nappy, and some partially consumed fruit farther out.

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On May 17, they discovered an apparent child-made makeshift shelter where they discovered scissors, hairbands, and little footprints. Most parents teach their children survival skills, which are crucial in some situations so they can live if they lose their way. They also stress the importance of eating and drinking habits, which should be ingrained in children from an early age.

Just a few hours later, the Institute of Family Welfare (ICBF), the nation’s child protection agency, issued a statement confirming that it had learned the kids were “alive and in good health.” However, difficulties in getting in touch with the kids, which the military blamed on challenging terrain and bad weather, caused uncertainty about the kids’ safety and whereabouts.

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He is an aviation journalist and the founder of Jetline Marvel. Dawal gained a comprehensive understanding of the commercial aviation industry.  He has worked in a range of roles for more than 9 years in the aviation and aerospace industry. He has written more than 1700 articles in the aerospace industry. When he was 19 years old, he received a national award for his general innovations and holds the patent. He completed two postgraduate degrees simultaneously, one in Aerospace and the other in Management. Additionally, he authored nearly six textbooks on aviation and aerospace tailored for students in various educational institutions. jetlinem4(at)gmail.com

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