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Go First seeks DGCA approval to resume operations with 22 aircraft

Lessors Have Applied For Deregistration Of 54 Go First Planes

According to PTI, the cash-strapped Go First Airline has submitted a resurrection plan to the aviation regulator DGCA in preparation for resuming its commercial flying operations in India. The low-cost carrier intends to resume operations with 26 aircraft and 152 daily flights while going through a voluntary insolvency resolution process.

The airline ceased operations on May 3, 2023, and the Directorate General of Civil Aviation requested a clear plan before it could resume flights within the nation. According to the report, the airline is in talks with lenders to obtain funds to cover its needs for operating capital.

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The Wadia Group-operated airline ceased operations a day after NCLT received its application for voluntary insolvency resolution proceedings, and it has not yet paid several senior-level executives and pilots. According to PTI,  who spoke on the condition of anonymity claimed that the carrier pays out roughly Rs 30 crore in salaries each month and that there are currently about 4,700 people working as many have put in their papers in one month.

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The airline management has submitted a recovery plan and is awaiting approval from the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) to resume flight operations. Go First is hoping to resume operations with a fleet of 26 aircraft, of which 22 will be used for active operations and 4 will be held as spares, under the proposal that was given to the DGCA this week.

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Go First had a fleet that flew 200 flights per day until April before running into financial difficulties and ceasing operations. The airline claimed that it has the necessary workforce—roughly 675 pilots and 1,300 cabin crew members—to operate its current fleet.

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