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Top Quality Airline Rating 2018 in United States

Boeing 787-9 “Dreamliner” to Join Hawaiian Airlines Fleet

Top Quality Airline Rating 2018 in United States

The Airline Quality Rating industry score for 2017 shows an industry that improved in overall performance quality over the previous year. Nine airlines (American, ExpressJet, Frontier, Hawaiian, JetBlue, SkyWest, Southwest, Spirit and United) showed improvement in AQR scores in 2017.

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1. Alaska Airlines

Founded in 1932, Alaska Airlines began on a route between Anchorage and Bristol Bay, Alaska. Shortly thereafter in 1934, a merger took place with Star Air Service, and while the airline changed several times, the name Alaska Airlines prevailed. During the 1940s, charter work including the Berlin Airlift and Operation Magic Carpet, aided thousands. Additional mergers in the late 1960s with Alaska Coastal-Ellis and Cordova Airlines further expanded routes. Alaska Airlines was also involved in the construction of the trans-Alaska Pipeline.

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Service has continued to expand. The airline now has routes to the East Coast, Washington D.C., multiple Midwestern towns as well as Hawaii. Alaska Airlines contributes its success to its people, “their caring, their resourcefulness, their integrity, their professionalism, and their spirit.”

2. Delta Air Lines

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A legacy carrier today, Delta Air Lines began as a crop-dusting operation, the Huff Daland Dusters, in Macon, Georgia. Passenger operations commenced in 1929, and the company became known as Delta Air Lines in 1934. In 1955, Delta blazed the trail with the implementation of the hub and spoke system for air travel. The company expanded by merging with Northeast Airlines in 1972 and acquiring Pan Am’s trans-Atlantic routes and the Pan Am Shuttle in 1991. Further expansion took place in 2008, as Delta acquired Northwest Airlines.

Today, along with Delta Connection, Delta Air Lines serves 312 communities in 54 countries. Together with members of the SkyTeam alliance, destinations span 648 cities in 123 countries on six continents. Delta’s 80,000 employees maintain and operate a fleet exceeding 800 aircraft.

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3. JetBlue

Early in 1999, David Neeleman laid forth his plans for a new airline. By the end of the year, JetBlue (initially known as “New Air”), had secured 75 aircraft and as many slots at JFK. In February 2000, the airline began operations. By the end of the same year, over one million passengers had flown on JetBlue.

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In the years that have followed, JetBlue expanded its fleet and route structure. Today, JetBlue operates flights in North, Central and South America. JetBlue currently partners with 40 airlines globally, offering a plethora of destination cities.

4. Hawaiian Airlines

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The first scheduled flight of Inter-Island Airways took off in 1929. Continuous growth ensued, and, in 1941, the airline was renamed Hawaiian Airlines in order to prepare for Transpacific flights. The following year, Hawaiian Airlines received the first U.S. Cargo Service Certificate.

Today, Hawaiian Airlines provides service to every major Hawaiian island, as well as destinations in North America, Asia and the South Pacific. Additionally, Hawaiian Airlines holds codeshare agreements with a multitude of airlines worldwide.

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5. Southwest Airlines

The vision for Southwest Airlines was sketched out on a cocktail napkin. After many legal hurdles were cleared, Southwest began service in 1971. Passengers responded positively to the airline and its $20 fares. Routes expanded from Texas, reaching the coast in the 1980s. Growth continued in the decades following, with destinations spanning the United States from coast to coast.

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Southwest is known for its 737 fleet, low fares, quick turns and corporate culture. Today, the airline serves approximately 100 communities in North America.

6. SkyWest Airlines

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SkyWest Airlines commenced operations in 1972 with the purchase of Dixie Airlines. Operations expanded as the airline entered into interline agreements in 1977. In 1986, the airline began to offer stock publicly under the symbol SKYW. The following year, SkyWest became a Delta Connection carrier.

Today, SkyWest Airlines partners with United, Delta, Alaska Airlines and American Airlines. SkyWest flies to hundred of destinations in North America, operating approximately 1,700 flights per day.

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7. Virgin America

Virgin America is a relative newcomer airline. Founded in 2007, Virgin America began as low-fare, high-technology company whose mission is “to make flying fun again”. Its fleet consists of Airbus A-320 aircraft.

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Headquartered in San Francisco, California, Virgin America offers destinations in the continental United States, Hawaii, and Mexico. The airline employs approximately 3,000.

8. United Airlines 

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United Airlines is one of the United States’ original legacy carriers. With roots as United Aircraft and Transport Corporation, the company evolved into United Air Lines and was advertised as the “World’s Largest Air Transport System.”

Currently, United serves over 335 cities, of which 127 are international destinations. The route structure is very comprehensive. Nearly 87,500 people are employed by the airline. United is headquartered in Chicago, Illinois.

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9. American Airlines

American Airlines began in 1926 with a flight piloted by Charles Lindberg carrying mail from St. Louis, Missouri to Chicago, Illinois. Soon thereafter, founder C.R. Smith was instrumental in bringing the DC-3, a plane that revolutionized aviation, into service. A legacy carrier, American Airlines continued to grow and expand routes over the decades that followed.

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In 2013, American Airlines’ AMR Corporation and US Airways Group formed the American Airlines Group. Two years later, American and US Airways began operating as one airline. American Airlines is a member of the oneworld® alliance, which serves more than 1,000 cities in 160 countries.

10. ExpressJet

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ExpressJet began operations as Atlantic Southeast Airlines. After acquiring Southeastern Airways in 1983, Atlantic Southeast became the first Delta Connection carrier. In 1996, Continental Airlines renamed Continental Express “ExpressJet” for market distinction. Fifteen years later, the new ExpressJet is formed when Atlantic Southeast and ExpressJet receive single operating certificate status from the Federal Aviation Administration.

Today, ExpressJet operates 1,500 flights per day to over 180 airports as American Eagle, Delta Connection and United Express. Their route map extends from the United States to destinations in Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean.

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11. Frontier Airlines

The original Frontier began in 1950 as a result of a merger among Arizona Airways, Challenger Airlines and Monarch Airlines. The airline later purchased Central Airlines in 1967. After the industry was deregulated in 1978, intense competition ensued and Frontier was sold to People Express in 1985. Shortly thereafter, Continental purchased the airline and the original Frontier ended. Frontier reemerged with a plan in 1993, when former Frontier executives started a new Frontier, which began operating with two aircraft in 1994. Fifteen years later, Frontier was purchased by Republic Airlines. In 2013, Republic sold Frontier to Indigo Partners.
Frontier Airlines is headquartered in Denver, Colorado, and serves over 55 communities in the United States, Mexico and the Dominican Republic. Over 3,000 employees contribute to over 275 daily flights.

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12. Spirit Airlines

Spirit Airlines began as Clippert Trucking Company in 1964. A decade later, the company was renamed Ground Air Transfer, Inc. The company then became Charter One and, in 1992 became Spirit Airlines. Scheduled passenger service followed.

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Over the years, Spirit has operated as a low-cost and ultra low cost carrier in North, Central and South America, as well as the Caribbean. In 2004, Spirit began its transition to an all-Airbus fleet which serves over 50 communities.

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Aviation

Can Airline Seat Cushions Be Used As Life Jackets?

Can Airline Seat Cushions Be Used As Life Jackets?

In the event of an aircraft ditching into water, there’s a common question: Can aircraft seats serve as an alternative to life jackets for flotation? The answer lies in understanding their respective functions.

While seat cushions can provide some buoyancy in water, they are not intended nor certified to function as life jackets. Their primary purpose is to offer cushioning for passengers during flight. On the other hand, life jackets are meticulously engineered to keep individuals afloat in water, equipped with buoyancy materials, secure straps, and reflective elements for visibility. They offer numerous advantages over mere cushions.

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While a seat cushion might offer temporary assistance in staying afloat, it’s not a dependable substitute for a proper life jacket during an emergency. It’s crucial to utilize approved safety equipment when near bodies of water. A life jacket, designed to keep a person buoyant for extended periods, offers the rigidity needed for prolonged flotation and allows for easy movement of the arms to navigate effectively.

What fabric is used in aircraft seats?


Seats are meticulously designed to fulfill multiple purposes, ensuring passenger comfort, safety, and protection from unforeseen circumstances like fires and accidents. A typical design incorporates an aluminum frame with blocks of polyurethane foam affixed to it. Additionally, a layer of fire-resistant fabric, such as Kevlar or Nomex, is often applied over this framework, topped with a layer of cloth or leather.

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Leather seats, while luxurious, are more expensive compared to traditional cloth seats. The majority of fabrics used in seat upholstery contain at least 90% wool fiber, with the remainder typically consisting of polyamide (nylon). Wool stands out as the primary fiber chosen for commercial airline seating fabric due to its desirable properties and suitability for such applications.

What is the lightest economy seat?

In recent times, airlines have been downsizing seat dimensions to accommodate more passengers, resulting in reduced cushion length and leg space. This contrasts with earlier times when airlines offered more generously cushioned seats and ample amenities.

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According to Recaro Seats Company, their SL3710 model represents the lightest economy class seat available, weighing in at a mere 8 kg (17.6 lb.), setting a new standard in aircraft seating.

For individuals weighing more than 350 pounds, fitting into a standard economy-class seat can be a challenge due to the narrower dimensions. Economy seats, also referred to as “coach,” “standard,” or “main cabin” seats, typically range from about 40 to 48 centimeters in width, further emphasizing the need for more accommodating seating options.

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Aviation

Does airline food have more salt? Here is the answer.

Does airline food have more salt? Here is the answer.
Image:Wikipedia


Whenever you fly with an airline, you often notice that the taste of the food is different from what you’re accustomed to on the ground. While passengers sometimes prioritize the food experience, have you ever wondered why airline food tends to be saltier? Let’s delve into this in the video.

Airline food has 15% more salt

One of the main challenges for chefs crafting meals served on airplanes is ensuring they are flavorful for passengers. To achieve this, chefs typically add more salt and seasoning, roughly 15% more salt is used, given that our taste buds are less sensitive by about 30% when we’re airborne.

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The Role of Sodium: Sodium is a key ingredient used to enhance flavor, especially in the air where our senses can be dulled. On average, airline meals contain over 800mg of sodium, exceeding 40% of the daily limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

Altitude Alters Perception

Flavors are perceived differently at higher altitudes due to the dry cabin air and low humidity levels, which can diminish our ability to taste and smell. To compensate, airline chefs amp up the salt and seasoning to elevate the food’s taste.

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Airline’s food Preservation:

Airline meals are prepared in advance and stored, necessitating longer preservation times. Salt serves as a natural preservative, ensuring the food maintains its quality and safety during storage and transportation.

However, excessive salt intake can pose health risks such as high blood pressure and dehydration, particularly problematic during air travel. Therefore, it’s crucial for airlines to strike a balance between flavor enhancement and maintaining a healthy sodium level in their meals.

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An Indian content creator and food analyst discovered that the Indian-based carrier, IndiGo Airlines, incorporates higher levels of salt into its meals compared to standard food practices. According to him, “Many of us are aware that Maggi is high in sodium! What most don’t realize is that IndiGo’s Magic Upma contains 50% more sodium than Maggi, IndiGo’s Poha boasts approximately 83% more sodium than Maggi, and even Daal Chawal matches Maggi’s sodium content.”

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Airlines

Why Don’t Airplanes Fly Over the Pacific Ocean?

Why don't flights fly over the Pacific Ocean?

Flights do indeed fly over the Pacific Ocean, but the routes they take are often determined by factors such as airline policies, air traffic control decisions, and weather conditions. The Pacific Ocean is one of the largest bodies of water on Earth, and it’s regularly crossed by numerous flights traveling between North America, Asia, Australia, and other destinations.

However, some specific routes might avoid flying directly over certain parts of the Pacific Ocean for various reasons. For example:

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  1. Safety and emergency considerations: While modern aircraft are equipped with advanced safety features, airlines, and pilots may prefer routes that keep them closer to potential diversion airports or within range of search and rescue facilities in case of emergencies.
  2. Air traffic control restrictions: Airspace management authorities may impose certain restrictions or preferred routes for managing air traffic efficiently. These restrictions could be based on factors such as military operations, airspace congestion, or diplomatic considerations.
  3. Weather conditions: Pilots and airlines consider weather patterns when planning routes. While the Pacific Ocean generally experiences fewer weather-related disruptions compared to other regions, factors like turbulence, thunderstorms, or tropical cyclones can influence route selection.
  1. Managing Cost Factors: In route planning, airlines have to take fuel prices, maintenance costs, crew charges, and other operating costs into account. Direct routes over the Pacific Ocean may be more cost-effective for shorter distances, but they may also necessitate extra safety precautions, including carrying more fuel for longer overwater operations.
  2. Remote Locations and Navigational Challenges: The Pacific Ocean’s vastness poses navigational issues, particularly for aircraft operating over isolated regions with few ground-based navigational aids. For precise positioning and route direction, pilots must mostly rely on satellite-based technology and onboard navigation systems, which may necessitate additional training and equipment purchases.
  3. Lack of Suitable Landing Options in the Pacific Ocean: Unlike regions with dense air traffic and numerous airports, the Pacific Ocean has vast stretches of open water with few suitable landing options in case of emergencies. While long-range aircraft are equipped with safety features like life rafts and emergency locator transmitters, the lack of nearby airports can increase the time it takes for rescue and recovery operations to reach distressed aircraft, posing additional risks to passengers and crew. Therefore, flight routes may be planned to ensure proximity to potential diversion airports or alternate landing sites in case of unforeseen circumstances.
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