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5 Things about the Chandrayaan-3 Launch

5 Things about the Chandrayaan-3 Launch

The ambitious Chandrayaan-3 expedition to the Moon is about to take off from India. The spacecraft will travel to the Moon on Launch vehicle Mark-III, also known as LVM3, India’s largest rocket. In order to attempt a gentle landing on the Moon by the end of August, the spacecraft will travel 3,84,000 km in just under 45 days.

Scientists predict that 16 minutes after liftoff on Friday at 2:35 p.m., the propulsion module will separate from the rocket and begin an approximately 5- to 6-times elliptical orbit of the earth, with 170 km closest to the planet and 36,500 km furthest away, moving in the direction of the lunar orbit.

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  1. Chandrayaan-3, India’s third lunar exploration project, is prepared to launch on the LVM3 launcher’s fourth operational mission (M4). By showing an easy landing on the lunar surface with its lunar module and traveling on the lunar surface, ISRO is opening new frontiers. Future interplanetary missions of ISRO should benefit from it.
  2. The purpose of Chandrayaan-3, which comprises of an indigenous propulsion module, a lander module, and a rover, is to develop and demonstrate new technologies needed for interplanetary missions. The propulsion Module’s primary duty is to transport the LM from the launch vehicle injection orbit to Lander separation.
  3. The ISRO’s LVM3 heavy-lift launch vehicle is now in use and has a stellar resume, having successfully completed 6 missions in a row. The Chandrayaan-3 spacecraft will be launched on this, LVM3’s fourth operational flight, into Geo Transfer Orbit (GTO).
  4. The structure of Chandrayaan-3 is based on a modified version of the I-3 K, ensuring improved performance and reliability. With a dry mass of 448.62 kg, which includes the pressurant, the spacecraft is designed to efficiently utilize its propellant mass of 1696.39 kg. The total payload mass, including the propellant, stands at 2145.01 kg.
  5. The Chandrayaan-3 is being constructed for about Rs 615 crore, according to ISRO. The lander rover and propulsion module for the mission would cost about Rs 250 crore, according to a report dated January 2020, while the launch service would cost an additional Rs 365 crore.

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