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Aviation

10 Interesting things you didn’t know about Virgin Airline.

10 Interesting things you didn't know about Virgin Airline.

1.In July 2017, Virgin Atlantic announced their intention to form a joint venture with Air France-KLM. Under the agreement, Air France-KLM will acquire a 31 percent stake in Virgin Atlantic currently held by Virgin Group.

The enhanced joint venture would establish a combined partnership with a duration of at least 15 years. In order to support the success of that cooperation:

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Air France-KLM will acquire a 31 percent stake in Virgin Atlantic currently held by Virgin Group for £220 million.

Virgin Group will retain a 20 percent stake and Chairmanship.

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2. Virgin produced the first film to be shot at 35,000ft on three commercial flights

In 2012, the romantic comedy Departure Date (starring Ben Feldman and Nicky Whelan) was filmed for eight days straight on flights between LA, London, and Sydney. As per the airline’s regulations, the film crew were only allowed two carry-ons each, and couldn’t film when the seat belt light came on. The cast and crew racked up a total of 28,358 miles, and some of the paying commercial passengers were featured as extras. Watch here.

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3. Steve Fossett singlehandedly flew around the world in a Virgin plane 

The Scaled Composites Model 311 Virgin Atlantic GlobalFlyer (registered N277SF) is an aircraft designed by Burt Rutan in which Steve Fossett flew a solo nonstop airplane flight around the world in 2 days 19 hours and 1 minute (67 hours 1 minute) from February 28 to March 3, 2005. The flight speed of 590.7 kilometres per hour (367.0 mph) set the world record for the fastest nonstop non-refueled circumnavigation, beating the mark set by the previous Rutan-designed Voyager aircraft at 9 days 3 minutes and an average speed of 116 miles per hour (187 km/h).

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The aircraft was owned by the pilot Steve Fossett, sponsored by Richard Branson’s airline, Virgin Atlantic, and built by Burt Rutan’s company, Scaled Composites. The two companies subsequently went on to work together on Virgin Galactic.

4. Delta Air Lines owns 49 percent of Virgin Atlantic

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Yep. In June 2013, Delta Air Lines bought a 49 percent stake in Virgin Atlantic from Singapore Airlines for $360 million. It might seem like a strange investment, but it’s well worth it for Delta, which now gets to fly its customers more frequently to London’s Heathrow Airport.

5. Virgin Atlantic. Humble with a Touch of Glamour.

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Virgin Atlantic is the brainchild of the mildly eclectic CEO, Sir Richard Branson, but did you know it was never his intention to start an airline? Virgin Atlantic was actually born out of a truly magical love story. Sir Richard Branson was on his way from Puerto Rico to meet a beautiful woman in the British Virgin Islands but was unfortunately left stranded along with other passengers. In a momentary act of valour, Richard Branson hired a plane, wrote on a blackboard “Virgin Air, $39 single flight” and the thought of starting Virgin Atlantic was born.

6. Cats and dogs can earn Velocity Frequent Flyer Points when they travel with Virgin Airlines.

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Velocity Frequent Flyer, the award-winning loyalty program of Virgin Australia today launched Australia’s first frequent flyer program for pets.

Breaking new ground in the loyalty space, from today, Velocity members can now earn 300 Points each time their dog or cat flies on Virgin Australia’s expansive domestic network. Silver, Gold and Platinum members will also receive a special Points bonus.

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Building on the program’s unique family benefits, today’s announcement makes Velocity the only frequent flyer program in Australia to recognize and reward four legged members of the family.

7. Virgin America was the first airline to make foldable boarding passes.

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Boarding passes are stupid. They don’t fit in passports, or pockets, or wallets. And by the time you hand over your dog-eared, crumpled document to a clerk behind the check-in desk, you’re bound to get a disapproving sneer.

Well, everyone’s favorite airline Virgin America is finally offering the simple solution in the form of a sexy, fold-friendly boarding pass. The document includes personal details, flight number, departure and arrival time, gate and terminal, along with the cabin and seat allocation. And it fits right into your back pocket, because that makes sense, and it’s ridiculous no airline has done this before.

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8. Richard Branson, the founder of Virgin America, owns his very own island.

Richard Branson had been madly trying to come up with a way to impress a girl he had fallen for, so he rang up the realtor, and expressed his interest. they were still in the early days of Virgin Records, and he by no means had the cash to buy an island. Luckily, the realtor didn’t know this and offered me an all-expenses paid trip to see the Islands that weekend. He agreed to go on one condition – if he could bring a guest.

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when the realtor quoted the ‘discounted’ asking price of $6 million, Smitten with the unspoilt paradise, and keen to impress his new love, he offered the highest amount he could afford: $100,000. As you can imagine, the realtor was less than impressed, and left us high and dry to find our own way back home.

A year later, a charming man named Derek Dunlop arrived at his houseboat in London and explained that nobody else had made an offer on Necker, and that the owner of the Island was desperate to sell. Virgin Records was in a much better position than it had been a year before, so he quickly agreed to a purchase price of $180,000 – the only condition was that he would need to build a resort on the Island within four years.

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9. Virgin Australia has been recognised as the most attractive employer in Australia in 2015 at the annual Randstad Award. It also placed in the top 3 for the last five years, including a top spot in 2011.

Amongst fierce competition, Virgin Australia has been named Australia’s Most Attractive Employer at the annual Randstad Award at Doltone House in Sydney.

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With half of all Aussies (50%) claiming they would like to work for the aviation giant, Virgin Australia held off strong competition to edge out two-time winner, the ABC, who came in second place and the Department of Immigration & Border Protection who took out the third spot.

10. Virgin Defunct airlines

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  • V Australia (Rebrand to Virgin Australia with Virgin Blue & Virgin Polynesia)
  • Virgin Nigeria (rebrand to Air Nigeria)
  • Virgin Express (rebrand to Brussels Airlines)
  • Virgin Express France
  • Virgin Sun (sold and merged into Air 2000)
  • Virgin Atlantic Little Red
  • Virgin Samoa

Aviation

Can Airline Seat Cushions Be Used As Life Jackets?

Can Airline Seat Cushions Be Used As Life Jackets?

In the event of an aircraft ditching into water, there’s a common question: Can aircraft seats serve as an alternative to life jackets for flotation? The answer lies in understanding their respective functions.

While seat cushions can provide some buoyancy in water, they are not intended nor certified to function as life jackets. Their primary purpose is to offer cushioning for passengers during flight. On the other hand, life jackets are meticulously engineered to keep individuals afloat in water, equipped with buoyancy materials, secure straps, and reflective elements for visibility. They offer numerous advantages over mere cushions.

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While a seat cushion might offer temporary assistance in staying afloat, it’s not a dependable substitute for a proper life jacket during an emergency. It’s crucial to utilize approved safety equipment when near bodies of water. A life jacket, designed to keep a person buoyant for extended periods, offers the rigidity needed for prolonged flotation and allows for easy movement of the arms to navigate effectively.

What fabric is used in aircraft seats?


Seats are meticulously designed to fulfill multiple purposes, ensuring passenger comfort, safety, and protection from unforeseen circumstances like fires and accidents. A typical design incorporates an aluminum frame with blocks of polyurethane foam affixed to it. Additionally, a layer of fire-resistant fabric, such as Kevlar or Nomex, is often applied over this framework, topped with a layer of cloth or leather.

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Leather seats, while luxurious, are more expensive compared to traditional cloth seats. The majority of fabrics used in seat upholstery contain at least 90% wool fiber, with the remainder typically consisting of polyamide (nylon). Wool stands out as the primary fiber chosen for commercial airline seating fabric due to its desirable properties and suitability for such applications.

What is the lightest economy seat?

In recent times, airlines have been downsizing seat dimensions to accommodate more passengers, resulting in reduced cushion length and leg space. This contrasts with earlier times when airlines offered more generously cushioned seats and ample amenities.

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According to Recaro Seats Company, their SL3710 model represents the lightest economy class seat available, weighing in at a mere 8 kg (17.6 lb.), setting a new standard in aircraft seating.

For individuals weighing more than 350 pounds, fitting into a standard economy-class seat can be a challenge due to the narrower dimensions. Economy seats, also referred to as “coach,” “standard,” or “main cabin” seats, typically range from about 40 to 48 centimeters in width, further emphasizing the need for more accommodating seating options.

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Aviation

Does airline food have more salt? Here is the answer.

Does airline food have more salt? Here is the answer.
Image:Wikipedia


Whenever you fly with an airline, you often notice that the taste of the food is different from what you’re accustomed to on the ground. While passengers sometimes prioritize the food experience, have you ever wondered why airline food tends to be saltier? Let’s delve into this in the video.

Airline food has 15% more salt

One of the main challenges for chefs crafting meals served on airplanes is ensuring they are flavorful for passengers. To achieve this, chefs typically add more salt and seasoning, roughly 15% more salt is used, given that our taste buds are less sensitive by about 30% when we’re airborne.

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The Role of Sodium: Sodium is a key ingredient used to enhance flavor, especially in the air where our senses can be dulled. On average, airline meals contain over 800mg of sodium, exceeding 40% of the daily limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

Altitude Alters Perception

Flavors are perceived differently at higher altitudes due to the dry cabin air and low humidity levels, which can diminish our ability to taste and smell. To compensate, airline chefs amp up the salt and seasoning to elevate the food’s taste.

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Airline’s food Preservation:

Airline meals are prepared in advance and stored, necessitating longer preservation times. Salt serves as a natural preservative, ensuring the food maintains its quality and safety during storage and transportation.

However, excessive salt intake can pose health risks such as high blood pressure and dehydration, particularly problematic during air travel. Therefore, it’s crucial for airlines to strike a balance between flavor enhancement and maintaining a healthy sodium level in their meals.

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An Indian content creator and food analyst discovered that the Indian-based carrier, IndiGo Airlines, incorporates higher levels of salt into its meals compared to standard food practices. According to him, “Many of us are aware that Maggi is high in sodium! What most don’t realize is that IndiGo’s Magic Upma contains 50% more sodium than Maggi, IndiGo’s Poha boasts approximately 83% more sodium than Maggi, and even Daal Chawal matches Maggi’s sodium content.”

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Airlines

Why Don’t Airplanes Fly Over the Pacific Ocean?

Why don't flights fly over the Pacific Ocean?

Flights do indeed fly over the Pacific Ocean, but the routes they take are often determined by factors such as airline policies, air traffic control decisions, and weather conditions. The Pacific Ocean is one of the largest bodies of water on Earth, and it’s regularly crossed by numerous flights traveling between North America, Asia, Australia, and other destinations.

However, some specific routes might avoid flying directly over certain parts of the Pacific Ocean for various reasons. For example:

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  1. Safety and emergency considerations: While modern aircraft are equipped with advanced safety features, airlines, and pilots may prefer routes that keep them closer to potential diversion airports or within range of search and rescue facilities in case of emergencies.
  2. Air traffic control restrictions: Airspace management authorities may impose certain restrictions or preferred routes for managing air traffic efficiently. These restrictions could be based on factors such as military operations, airspace congestion, or diplomatic considerations.
  3. Weather conditions: Pilots and airlines consider weather patterns when planning routes. While the Pacific Ocean generally experiences fewer weather-related disruptions compared to other regions, factors like turbulence, thunderstorms, or tropical cyclones can influence route selection.
  1. Managing Cost Factors: In route planning, airlines have to take fuel prices, maintenance costs, crew charges, and other operating costs into account. Direct routes over the Pacific Ocean may be more cost-effective for shorter distances, but they may also necessitate extra safety precautions, including carrying more fuel for longer overwater operations.
  2. Remote Locations and Navigational Challenges: The Pacific Ocean’s vastness poses navigational issues, particularly for aircraft operating over isolated regions with few ground-based navigational aids. For precise positioning and route direction, pilots must mostly rely on satellite-based technology and onboard navigation systems, which may necessitate additional training and equipment purchases.
  3. Lack of Suitable Landing Options in the Pacific Ocean: Unlike regions with dense air traffic and numerous airports, the Pacific Ocean has vast stretches of open water with few suitable landing options in case of emergencies. While long-range aircraft are equipped with safety features like life rafts and emergency locator transmitters, the lack of nearby airports can increase the time it takes for rescue and recovery operations to reach distressed aircraft, posing additional risks to passengers and crew. Therefore, flight routes may be planned to ensure proximity to potential diversion airports or alternate landing sites in case of unforeseen circumstances.
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