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British Airways Twin Brothers born 30 minutes apart celebrate their 60th birthdays by retiring ..30 seconds Apart. 

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Twin brothers have landed their final flights for British Airways just 30 seconds apart after clocking up more than 45,000 flying hours between them.

Jeremy and Nick Hart celebrated their 60th birthdays by touching down at Heathrow Airport for the final time.

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Nick flew in from Gothenburg at 12.34pm on Thursday, with Jeremy right behind him, landing from Geneva at 12.35pm.

The two brothers never flew in the same BA crew because they are both captains.

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Jeremy started with the airline in 1987 and Nick joined in 2012 when British Midland was taken over.

Left: Jeremy Hart
Right: Nicholas Hart
Taken: 1992
Copyright: Nicholas Hart

British Airways – Retiring Pilots
Left: Nicholas Hart
Right: Jeremy Hart
Taken: 28th September 2017
Picture by: Stuart Bailey

“I’ve done 28 years of short-haul flying. That’s about 11,000 flights. It’s at least 1.2 million passengers,” said Nick.

Although not identical twins, Nick said their similarity had led to the odd tricky situation.

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“Years ago Jerry never mentioned to his colleagues at British Airways that he had a twin brother who flew for British Midland, and one day a British Airways pilot strode over to me at Heathrow and asked what on Earth I thought I was doing dressing up in a British Midland uniform.

“It took a bit of explaining to convince him that I wasn’t Jerry!”

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Jeremy, from Flitton in Bedfordshire, said he had spent a total of two and a half years flying, and joked: “A lot of it in the holding pattern over Heathrow.”

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Airlines

These are Europe’s Top10 best Airports for Wait Times in 2023

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These are Europe's Top10 best Airports for Wait Times in 2023

Airports can be a stressful experience for travelers, with huge queues and extended wait times becoming the norm. However, by 2023, certain European airports have made significant advances towards alleviating this difficulty, putting passenger satisfaction and efficient processes first.

These are Europe’s Top10 Worst Airports for Wait Times in 2023(Opens in a new browser tab)

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These airports have managed to make the waiting game a seamless and even fun part of the journey, thanks to cutting-edge technology and expedited security processes. In this article, we’ll look at the top ten European airports with the best wait times, making travel not only more efficient but also more enjoyable for everyone.

In a recent survey conducted by Casago, placed the spotlight on the some of Europe’s best airport experiences. Casago looked examined customer evaluations from airlinequality.com, where each reviewer rated the queueing times from 1 to 5 stars, to determine which airports have the best and worst queueing times.

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Courtesy: Casago

The top airport in Europe for Queing is Belgrade Airport in Serbia, where 66.67% of travelers rank the Queuing times as 4 or 5 stars. ACI Europe recognized the airport as Europe’s best for Quality of service in 2021. Despite the recent claims that Belgrade Airport is “still struggling with long lines,” when it comes to passenger complaints reviews and wait times, the Serbian airport is considered the best in Europe.

Helsinki Vantaa Airport, in Finland, came in second place with 63.22%, followed by Stuttgart airport in Germany (61.90%), Malta International Airport (60.00%) and Porto Airport in Portugal (58.82%).

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Airlines

These are Europe’s Top10 Worst Airports for Wait Times in 2023

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Unrevealing the Europe's Top10 Worst Airports for Wait Times in 2023

Airports are often considered to be the gateways to the world, connecting people to new experiences, cultures, and destinations. They are bustling hubs of activity, where the excitement of embarking on a journey mingles with the anticipation of reuniting with loved ones. However, not all airports manage to live up to these expectations.

In a recent survey conducted by Casago, placed the spotlight on some of the Europe’s most dreadful airport experiences. Casago looked examined customer evaluations from airlinequality.com, where each reviewer rated the queueing times from 1 to 5 stars, to determine which airports have the best and worst queueing times.

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Europe’s Top 10 Punctual Airlines & their OTP(Opens in a new browser tab)

Based on identifying the home country of each reviewer and ranking countries according to the lowest percentage of reviews that are 4 or 5 stars, the study also reveals which nationalities complain the most about airport queues.

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Courtesy: Casago

Grenoble Alpes Isère Airport (1.59%) in France is Europe’s – and the world’s – worst airport for queuing. The airport’s passenger traffic is primarily made up of people looking for winter activities. However, the popularity of the skiing season results in congested airports and long waits.

Berlin Brandenburg Airport, in Germany, came in second place with 5.73%. Three UK airports also receive the lowest ratings for airport queues on the continent, despite the fact that it is a universal truth that the British enjoy a good queue. One of them is London Stansted Airport (8,88%), which appears to still have queuing issues after building a new arrivals facility for £130 million in 2020 to reduce congestion.

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Grenoble Alpes Isère Airport is the worst of all, with only 1.59% of evaluations receiving four or five stars, followed by Bordeaux Airport (7.01%), and Paris-Beauvais Airport (8.77%). One of three airports serving the City of Light is Paris-Beauvais Airport. BVA, which derives its name from the neighbouring town of Beauvais, is located around 50 miles outside of Paris, which results in even longer transfer times.

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Aerospace

Virgin Orbit wants to be the ‘Uber for satellites’. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

Virgin Orbit put the satellite in Space Orbit for an affordable price. The new Uber business in the space.

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Virgin Orbit wants to be the 'Uber for satellites'. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

The space market is a unique market because so few businesses and organizations are engaged in it. In the past, only government-funded organizations such as NASA from the USA, Russia, India, and China—among many others—were used to send satellites into orbit. Obtaining approval to send satellites through such organizations, which also included receiving geopolitical recommendations, took a fair amount of time. however, private firms have started to enter the industry during the past ten years, like Elon Musk’s SpaceX initiative. It is currently one of the most popular space launch services. However, the same Virgin corporation is also active in the space industry as they launch satellites and rockets using Boeing 747 jumbo jets. which would be a quicker technique for starting a small version satellite.

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One of Virgin’s two main programs is Virgin Galactic, which runs commercial flights for tourism purposes and offers orbital tours, which are very interesting to many interested tourists. in the same time and space. one more amazon follows Blue Origin One of each was established by Jeff Bezos in the year 2000. However, Virgin is also involved in the Virgin Orbit program, providing services including mid-air rocket and satellite launches.

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How does Virgin Orbit operate?

The satellite is carried by a Boeing 747 jumbo jet and launched from a platform atop some space travel. The launches will aid in the expansion of Spire Space Services, a platform that provides customers with quick and scalable access to space through a subscription model, as well as ongoing upgrades and enhancements to the company’s fully deployed satellite constellation. They serve as an example of the growing demand for small satellites. Spire will launch to a variety of orbits, from mid-inclination to polar, all from Virgin Orbit’s first spaceport in Mojave, California, taking full advantage of LauncherOne’s proven adaptability.

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Virgin Orbit wants to be the 'Uber for satellites'. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

Courtesy: Virgin orbit

A second chance for the 747

As is acknowledged, the Boeing 747 is gradually winding down from commercial flight operations due to a decline in demand as well as the need for extensive aircraft maintenance. However, it discovered a new way of life with Virgin Orbit, where it serves as a satellite launch pad. where it will be a component of the one big space mission that greatly enhances satellite networking. In the USA, GE engines are also tested on the Boeing 747. Additionally, it plays a crucial role in the testing of new engines. It can be utilized as a test bed or as a space observatory due to its four engines.

Virgin Orbit wants to be the 'Uber for satellites'. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

Courtesy: Virgin Orbit

The space’s Virgin has now evolved into UBER.

Many businesses are searching for long-term viability in the market as competition increases. Space exploration is an expensive endeavor, but once you succeed, you can manage your corporation with ease. The space program has joined the private sector in order to compete with other organizations. Virgin Orbit, founded by Richard Branson, aims to become “Uber for satellites.” To launch satellites into orbit, the business uses a rocket hung beneath the wing of a jumbo jet. The business claims its delivery approach offers a significant benefit.

Virgin Orbit wants to be the 'Uber for satellites'. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

Courtesy: Virgin Orbit

Virgin Orbit and Spire Global collaborate

Spire Global and Virgin Orbit previously demonstrated the flexibility of LauncherOne’s rapid call-up capabilities with the late-load of Spire’s ADLER-1 satellite on board the Above the Clouds mission from Mojave, California in January 2022—a mission that took just 22 days from the initial call-up to payload integration. Building on that achievement, the two companies are working together to provide Spire’s international clientele with speedy and adaptable launch solutions.

Spire Global, Inc. (NYSE: SPIR), a global provider of space-based data, analytics, and space services, has entered a legally binding Launch Service Agreement with the top launch provider Virgin Orbit (Nasdaq: VORB), to purchase numerous launches over a number of years, building on their shared track record for productive collaboration in responsive space. In 2023, the first launch is anticipated.

  • Spire Global has committed to purchase multiple launches from Virgin Orbit, starting in 2023.
  • The launches will support Spire’s growing Space Services business as well as upgrades and enhancements to the company’s fully deployed satellite constellation.
  • The launches are part of Virgin Orbit’s growing launch backlog as it heads towards its first international launch later this year from the United Kingdom.

Virgin Orbit wants to be the 'Uber for satellites'. Its cost-effectiveness is explained.

Courtesy: Virgin Orbit

A reasonable cost for orbiting your satellite.

Spire has now been added to Virgin Orbit’s growing list of clients that want both launch site and orbital destination flexibility. Virgin Orbit is committed to offering the commercial, academic, and governmental small satellite industries flexible, inexpensive, quick launch opportunities anytime, anywhere.

Courtesy: Virgin Orbit for more information click here.

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